Save your own seed

We have a community seed bank which always needs donations and turns up to all our events for deposits and withdrawals. There is a list of all the seed that has been donated and we keep a sample of each in the bank but the rest is out there in the community. The packets are all now hand made from recycled paper by our members, please feel free to make your own. We are happy to run seed workshops or bring the seed bank to your community groups.

What to plant when?
Southern harvest Cool climate PDF
Southern harvest what to plant now online guide
Peter Cundall All year round planting
Diggers what to plant
Gardenate

Why save seed?
1. Home-saved Seeds are for free
2. It is Easy to Produce Seeds
3. You Have an Abundance to Share
4. Self Seeding Saves Time
5. You Eat Better
6. You Eat attractive vegetables and fruit
7. Home-saved Seeds Germinate Better
8. Local Adaptations Suit your Climate and Conditions
9. Local Varieties are Resilient and Rustic
10. You Avoid GE Crops
11. Home-saved Seeds are Climate Ready
12. You Remain Independent from Big Money
13. You Preserve the Diversity of Food Crops for Future Generations
Source: http://blog.seedsavers.org/blog/open-pollinated-heirloom-and-hybrid-seeds

Seed Saving information
Seed broadcast list of seed saving resources
Millennium Seed Project Kew
International Seed Saving Institute
Real Seed Company Handouts At the bottom of the left column are several great short hand outs for free
Seed Alliance Booklet Download a 30 page booklet.
Seed Savers Books and Booklets
ABC Gardening seed saving

Seed Saving Videos
Seed of freedom, 30 minute documentary, 5 languages
The Seeds of Sovereignty 36 mins, The Seeds of Sovereignty shares the stories of African communities embarking on a journey to revive their traditional seed diversity, and take back control over their food systems
Seed Saver Youtube channel

Banking Diversity, 8 minutes
Role of woman farmers in Seed saving Indigenous crops 3 minutes
Temescal Seed Swap, 9minutes
Seed Swap, seed matters, 3 minutes
Seed Saving, conserving agricultures diversity
Seed Saving presentation, part 1 60 minutes
Seed Saving presentation, part 2 60 minutes
A personnel story of Seed Saving, 15 minutes
Specific Seed saving instructions, short individual videos to down load
The Farmer, the architect, the scientist, 6 minutes. The saving in India

Seed Saving links
A library for your seeds
‘Seed Libraries’ try to save the world’s plants
Pelitis Seed Bank
Navdanya Seed Bank
Floredomayo Seed Temple Vimeo
Seed of Trade Natural History Museum Data base of where our food comes from
Sowing for Apocalypse New Yorker Article on the Seed Saving
Seed and Nursery Catalogue for US and Europe History article dating back to 1900’s
Seed Jewellery Jamaican Seed Jewellery
The Great Seed Festival 2014 UK

Types of seed

Open-pollination is when pollination occurs by insect, bird, wind, humans, or other natural mechanisms. Because there are no restrictions on the flow of pollen between individuals, open-pollinated plants are more genetically diverse. This can cause a greater amount of variation within plant populations, which allows plants to slowly adapt to local growing conditions and climate year-to-year. As long as pollen is not shared between different varieties within the same species, then the seed produced will remain true-to-type year after year.

An heirloom variety is a plant variety that has a history of being passed down within a family or community, similar to the generational sharing of heirloom jewelry or furniture. An heirloom variety must be open-pollinated, but not all open-pollinated plants are heirlooms. While some companies create heirloom labels based on dates (such as a variety that is more than 50 years old), Seed Savers Exchange identifies heirlooms by verifying and documenting the generational history of preserving and passing on the seed.

Hybridization is a controlled method of pollination in which the pollen of two different species or varieties is crossed by human intervention. Hybridization can occur naturally through random crosses, but commercially available hybridized seed, often labeled as F1, is deliberately created to breed a desired trait. The first generation of a hybridized plant cross also tends to grow better and produce higher yields than the parent varieties due to a phenomenon called ‘hybrid vigor’. However, any seed produced by F1 plants is genetically unstable and cannot be saved for use in following years. Not only will the plants not be true-to-type, but they will be considerably less vigorous. Gardeners who use hybrid plant varieties must purchase new seed every year. Hybrid seeds can be stabilized, becoming open-pollinated varieties, by growing, selecting, and saving the seed over many years.

Source: http://blog.seedsavers.org/blog/open-pollinated-heirloom-and-hybrid-seeds

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Contact details
Facebook: facebook/urbanfarmingtasmania
Website: urbanfarmingtasmania.org
Email: urbanfarmingtasmania@hotmail.com
Twitter: @urbanfarmingtas
Mail: C/O Bracknell Post Office

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4 thoughts on “Save your own seed

  1. Do you have more details on how you are making seed packets from recycled paper? I’d love to share your story with my subscribers who are all interested in sharing / upcycling and not wasting things.

    • Hi There,
      the seed packet making is super simple, all you need to do is go to office works and find an envelope that suits the size that you want to make, take it home and deconstruct it (steam helps the glue release).
      Trace the outline of the unfolded envelope onto some heavier card that you can use as a template and cut it out.
      select the paper that you want to use (we prefer old-school style books from the tip shop or through donations), and trace the template onto the paper.
      cut it out (you should be able to do between 5-10 at a time depending on the paper weight.
      then simply fold tightly and use some glue to hold it all together (we use either glu sticks or PVA, depending on what is cheap.

    • Hi There,
      the seed packet making is super simple, all you need to do is go to office works and find an envelope that suits the size that you want to make, take it home and deconstruct it (steam helps the glue release).
      Trace the outline of the unfolded envelope onto some heavier card that you can use as a template and cut it out.
      select the paper that you want to use (we prefer old-school style books from the tip shop or through donations), and trace the template onto the paper.
      cut it out (you should be able to do between 5-10 at a time depending on the paper weight.
      then simply fold tightly and use some glue to hold it all together (we use either glu sticks or PVA, depending on what is cheap.

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